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Wild Edible Mushrooms (Boletus and Xerocomus) harvest in October

2011 October 6

It’s already October and there is no rain yet. I think the last rain have been 1 month ago and because of that our favorite place in Eifel Nature Park has very few gill and no pored mushrooms. Last weekend we have decided to check the Taunus mountain area as the temperature there is few degrees cooler and morning fogs give some moisture. The greatest part of this forest consists of pine and spruce  trees mixed with oak and beech trees. Surprisingly we’ve been right to come there early morning.  Of course, we did not find big and mature mushrooms – they require a lot of water which is not there yet. Instead we have collected rather young mushrooms. Unfortunately, along our mushroom hunting we have seen many little young mushrooms which were dried out without having a chance to mature.

So, this all has started with Boletus badius (aka Bay Bolete) which were in a good shape – firm and quite developed and last Suillus granulatus (Weeping Bolete). May old Suillus species were too soft and partially had lost their cap’s color, so we did not touch those concentrating on young firm mushrooms. The description and photos of those two (Boletus badius and Suillis granulatus) can be found in my elder post “Wild Edible Mushrooms (Boletus and Suillus) harvest in July“. In fact, we can see that those two mushroom species grow through the whole mushrooms season starting from July till October. Both were found mostly in cool temperatures of mountain area. This summer July and August were rainy months, so sometimes some old mushrooms were too watery. And September and beginning of October are somewhat sunny, warm and dry months.

As we moved along the forest we have stepped into area which was full of Boletus chrysenteron (Red Cracking Bolete). On the photos below you may notice that they have somewhat different color of the caps though it’s more related to the soil conditions. In fact, the grayish color of the caps of mushrooms on the right photo has a layer of pinkish color underneath. So, when this grayish layer cracks it’s possible to see pinkish color through those cracks. And if you have a close look at the cap’s cut you will notice the pinkish color of the top part of the cap. The surface of the cap reminds me a bit nubuck (material used for shoes) :)

The color of the stem which is yellow at the very top and then it’s red till the very bottom. The pored surface has lemon yellow color and the flesh of this mushroom is pale lemon yellow. Does not change the color when you touch it or cut. If you have a close look at the cut you will notice the pinkish color

Boletus chrysenteron (Xerocomus chrysenteron) - Red Cracking Bolete

Boletus chrysenteron (Xerocomus chrysenteron) - Red Cracking Bolete in the forest

Boletus chrysenteron (Xerocomus chrysenteron) - Red Cracking Bolete

Collected Boletus chrysenteron (Xerocomus chrysenteron) - Red Cracking Bolete

Boletus chrysenteron (Xerocomus chrysenteron) - Red Cracking Bolete Caps

Boletus chrysenteron (Xerocomus chrysenteron) - Red Cracking Bolete Caps

Boletus chrysenteron (Xerocomus chrysenteron) - Red Cracking Bolete stem

Boletus chrysenteron (Xerocomus chrysenteron) - Red Cracking Bolete stem

Flesh of the Boletus chrysenteron (Xerocomus chrysenteron) - Red Cracking Bolete Caps

Flesh of the Boletus chrysenteron (Xerocomus chrysenteron) - Red Cracking Bolete Caps

We were surprised to find few Xerocomus ferrugineus which resemble Xerocomus subtomentosus. The difference between these two I will describe in the next post.

So, on the photos below you can see the cap’s surface which is like a lava rock with some tiny bubbles. The cap is firm and steady of the olive greenish color. The pored surface has slightly brighter color than Boletus Chrysenteron (Xerocomus Chrysenteron) and the stem has light beige color with brown coarse network on it. The flesh of the mushroom is whiter than the flesh of Boletus Chrysenteron (Xerocomus Chrysenteron) though not as white as flesh of Boletus badius. So, let’s say it’s not a pure crystal white :) When Xerocomus ferrugineus is cut it does not change the color and neither the pored surface change the color when touched.

Xerocomus ferrugineus Cap

Xerocomus ferrugineus cap

Xerocomus ferrugineus pored surface

Xerocomus ferrugineus pored surface

Xerocomus ferrugineus Stem

Xerocomus ferrugineus stem

Xerocomus ferrugineus cap cut in halves

Xerocomus ferrugineus cap cut in halves

Unexpectedly, we did find one Boletus impolitus (known as Iodine Bolete) though I missed to make it’s detailed photos. It’s presented on a group photos below :)

Boletus badius, Suillus granulatus, Boletus Chrysenteron, Xerocomus ferrugineus and Boletus Impolitus

Top raw - Boletus badius, Suillus granulatus; Middle raw - Boletus Chrysenteron and Boletus Impolitus (one mushroom on the right); Bottom raw - Boletus Chrysenteron and Xerocomus ferrugineus

Wild edible mushrooms harvest in October

Wild edible mushrooms harvest in October

We also have collected some of the Lactarius delicious (Saffron milk cap). They grow rather in large groups than one-by-one but most of them are eaten by worms (perhaps, they are looking for water). So, out of my experience there is a formula – 1 out of 15 Saffron milk caps will be untouched by warms. And this one is usually little young fellow. You can imagine that after my attempts to find the good Saffron milk cap the area looked like a battle field :)

Lactarius delicious in the forest

Lactarius delicious in the forest

Mature Lactarius delicious mushrooms

Mature Lactarius delicious mushrooms

What a joy we have felt when at the end we have found one Boletus Edulis (King Bolete, Cep, Porcini) and what disappointment we’ve got when we cut it – it was eaten by warms :(

Boletus edulis in the forest

Boletus edulis in the forest

Unusual place for growing of a wild mushroom

Unusual place for growing of a wild mushroom

And after all the scientists may be right that wild mushrooms change their behavior or growing habits. We have found few times Boletus mushrooms grown on the pine cones :)

I hope you have had fun with your mushroom harvest and can share with me your story!

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2 Responses leave one →
  1. October 7, 2011

    I enjoy this issue on bolate in early October and found Boletus badius is not reported in Japan. In early October how is your typical whether in your city(? ) in Germany? may be similar to Hokkaido?

    • Anastasia permalink*
      October 27, 2011

      Hi Shunji,
      Glad to hear you :) Well, I would say that Boletus badius does not depend on the climate so much, rather on the soil condition. We usually drive to the North-West from Frankfurt to collect wild mushrooms and this year we have found Boletus badius from July till October 1st. The weather in that mountain area was no hotter than 20C and it was humid in mornings because of cold nights. August and September were very dry months and I was surprised that any mushrooms could grow in such conditions. So, from the climate point of view Boletus badius needs same conditions as any other wild mushrooms.
      I think in Hokkaido you might have different type of forest from the one growing here. It’s mostly Pine, Spruce and Beech, Oak trees. Only those trees are good for most Boletus mushrooms.

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